LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Ask and answer questions, share tips and resources for installing lighting and other electronics in your models.

Moderators: Sparky, Moderators

User avatar
brt
Posts: 1470
Joined: Thu Feb 14, 2008 6:04 pm
Location: Waiting for the Mothership

Post by brt » Mon Oct 29, 2012 1:58 pm

Depends on whether there are 4 color bands or 5 on the resistor. The chart that you provided the link to shows 5 bands at the bottom and 4 at the top example. For 150 ohms with four bands, you would want
brown, green, then brown as a multiplier of 10 and tolerance doesn't matter as we already have a 25% cushion. So brown means 1, green is the 5 and the brown multiplier of 10 = 150.

for 5 bands brown, green and black makes 150. Add black on the 4th band as a muliplier of 1 and the 5th band doesn't matter again in this example as we have a 25% cushion.

User avatar
duck
Posts: 1923
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2002 5:59 pm
Location: There are alot of deer here...

Post by duck » Fri Apr 26, 2013 9:09 pm

Burn your dead.

User avatar
Captain Riker
Posts: 1636
Joined: Fri Feb 06, 2009 12:09 pm
Location: New Jersey

Post by Captain Riker » Tue May 07, 2013 9:25 am

Might be useful to figure out what resistor: http://www.midibox-shop.com/res.html

Kabriya
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jun 19, 2013 12:48 pm

Post by Kabriya » Wed Jun 19, 2013 12:59 pm

en'til Zog wrote:Here's some basic inflamation about LEDs & such....




For the REALLY intese folks, there is a new breed of LED that takes (for instance) 3.6 volts at one quarter AMP - 250 mA or 12.5 times more power than the usual LED. The good thing? 480,000 mCd or 480 candle power, typical. THAT’s enough to blind you, literally. These are designed for lighting purposes, and Special Effects use. They come in RED, GREEN, BLUE, AQUA, and even WHITE. They DO get warm, hot even, compared to ‘normal’ low power LEDs but put out a stunning amount of light. And a lot less heat than an equivalent incandescent light source. What are they? LumiLED STAR LEDs, costing about $12.00 US EACH. ZOT! NOT for the inexperienced LED flasher. Where to find these? Try the nice folks at www.theLEDLight.com. Oh, and there are brighter ones - 3 watt units ( 0.830 amps at 3.6 volts) and a super bright 5 watt unit. These DO NOT run cool - they generate heat, but they're still a lot more efficient than bulbs. And they come in colors!

ALL Electronics now has a nice assortment of 1 or 2 WATT LEDs, not Luxeons. The BLUE and WHITE and GREEN ones run about $ 11.50 each and the RED and AMBER ones run $ 8.00 each. These can be run at 0.360 Amps OR 0.720 Amps making them quite bright. And quite warm.

Pity we can’t include pictures here. Yet....



What does “Viewing Angleâ€￾ mean?

“Viewing Angleâ€￾ refers to the cone of light thrown out by a ‘clear’ LED. The ‘angle’ refered to is the angle from the axis of the LED (a line directly OUT from the center of the LED) to the edge of the cone of brightness thrown by the LED. So the CONE is actually TWICE the viewing angle WIDE.


Well, now there are gazillions of types of LEDs available. I’ve just gotten in two “Luxeon Lumiledsâ€￾ that qualify for ‘cheap flashlight ’ status without question. Incredibly bright optical packages like a stack of 8 quarters. One is in BLUE.

So now super bright LEDs are available and we can make our models shine, glow, and blast with light.

BUT....

We can also make them shimmer, quietly.

One of my favorite pocket LED lights is a “PALâ€￾ light. The LED is always lit, at a very low level. A “Find Meâ€￾ feature. All night it shines a puddle of light on my bedroom ceiling. And the 9 volt battery that powers it lasts for about 2 years. TWO YEARS ON, constantly glowing away.
dramatically.

Our models don’t have to glare at people in the night. They can glow quietly. Be “onâ€￾ while drawing a negligible amount of power. Pretty, lit, with very very long battery life.

It’s an idea.


4060 chips - how many LEDs can you drive?

The 4060 chip is wonderful for driving LEDs. Mainly 'cause it doesn't deliver more current than any known LED can stand. EACH output from the 4060 can SOURCE or SINK only about 11 milliAmps - can only deliver 11 mA in either a POSITIVE or a NEGATIVE state.

Now, you can drive several LEDs in SERIES from one output as long as the total voltage the series string needs doesn't exceed the voltage you're supplying to the 4060.

EXAMPLE: you drive the 4060 with 12 volts. You can drive a series string of 6 RED LEDs rated at 1.9 volts @ quite nicely, but not at full brightness (11.4 volts for the string). OR you can drive a series string of 3 BLUE or WHITE LEDs rated at 3.6 volts @ (10.8 volts total). BUT - each string will have only 11 mA flowing through it.

If all the 4060's outputs are lighting LEDs there may be some dimming if you haven't given the 4060 enough milli-Amperage to begin with. Say, 12 LEDs at 11 mA will need about 150 mA supplied to the 4060. Since I usually drive my circuits with a 9 volt battery with no current limiting to the 4060, I don't have a lot of trouble with dimming or power starvation. One circuit uses 3@ 4060 chips, and 60 or so LEDs - there is no noticeable dimming using one (rather stressed) 9 volt battery.

First suggestion? Get a cheap "Experimenter's block" or "Breadboard" and layout your 4060 circuit along with the LEDs you're trying to drive. The old engineering "Cut and Try" method. ALL and JAMECO have these boards for about 4 buck US.
It's important to note that not all white-colored LEDs are reasonable quality. The mature kinds, and perhaps the more at low costs designed ones made these days, are usually very bluish. This is because the real LED part of a white-colored LED is a single, short-wavelength shade like red or purple, which is then moved to a wide range of longer wavelengths with coverings of phosphorescent components. Good, contemporary white-colored LEDs give a much better white-colored shade impact. Xmas light white-colored LEDs will usually be quite bluish. I think the common E-Bay white-colored LEDs are much better, equally cost, and don't need any work to get at the brings.

modelbldr_207582
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:19 pm

Re: LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Post by modelbldr_207582 » Mon Aug 07, 2017 11:18 am

Blinking Lights

Forgive me if this reply or topic is in the wrong page, I'm getting my feet wet as to where to ask questions on a Reply or New Topic. And away we go;

Does anyone have experience with Blink/Flash LEDs?

I purchased - IN0451 3mm LED Green BLINK / FLASH 1.5hz Clear Round Top TEN Pack With Resistors for 12v and IN0450 3mm LED Red BLINK / FLASH 1.5hz Clear Round Top TEN Pack With Resistors for 12v from - http://hdamodelworx.com/

I have time to experiment with these lights since the paint order is being processed and will not be here for a while. I know you can get the same result from a 555 Timer Chip but I’m looking to see if I’m able to get the same results with these lights

Any and all comments are welcome regarding this issue. I have soldered wires together to repair damaged wires but have never used resistors or Timer Chips. I've seen videos but have not actually put anything that I've learned into practice.

IN0450 and IN0451 are part numbers only

mophius
Posts: 53
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2017 8:18 am

Re: LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Post by mophius » Mon Aug 07, 2017 1:02 pm

modelbldr_207582 wrote:
Mon Aug 07, 2017 11:18 am
Blinking Lights

Forgive me if this reply or topic is in the wrong page, I'm getting my feet wet as to where to ask questions on a Reply or New Topic. And away we go;

Does anyone have experience with Blink/Flash LEDs?

I purchased - IN0451 3mm LED Green BLINK / FLASH 1.5hz Clear Round Top TEN Pack With Resistors for 12v and IN0450 3mm LED Red BLINK / FLASH 1.5hz Clear Round Top TEN Pack With Resistors for 12v from - http://hdamodelworx.com/

I have time to experiment with these lights since the paint order is being processed and will not be here for a while. I know you can get the same result from a 555 Timer Chip but I’m looking to see if I’m able to get the same results with these lights

Any and all comments are welcome regarding this issue. I have soldered wires together to repair damaged wires but have never used resistors or Timer Chips. I've seen videos but have not actually put anything that I've learned into practice.

IN0450 and IN0451 are part numbers only
Let me know how these work out for you as I may have to purchase some for myself. I am a 1/2500 Trek builder and am looking at lighting some models. These would be ideal for the marker lights.
Also let me know what the flash rate is, I wouldn't want them to blink too fast.

Do they do white as well for the strobe markers
There is no dark side of the moon really, matter of fact its all dark.

Imgur

modelbldr_207582
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:19 pm

Re: LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Post by modelbldr_207582 » Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:12 pm

I just received them in the mail today and they work great. My problem is the Red and Green LEDs that Blink/Flash are too fast. I want to slow them down so they Blink/Flash 4 to 6 times a minute rather than off and on, which is much faster than I expected.

I'm wondering if I need to restrict the flow of current to slow the rate of Blink/Flash to a slower pace. I also have discovered that the 3 mm are to big for areas such as the saucer section. I will have to reduce the size to SMD where they will fit better into the tight area that I had in mind. I will be trying it again to be sure but the 3 mm are not as small and I thought they would be. If you're doing 1/2500 then you should be getting Micro or Nano SMDs for the builds you're doing. I don't think 3 mm will fit for your desired intentions.

I ordered these LED supplies on Thursday and and received them today. I thought that the paint would get her before the LED but that order is being processed.

mophius
Posts: 53
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2017 8:18 am

Re: LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Post by mophius » Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:37 pm

You can file away at the top of the LED's to make them fit your needs just be careful of going near the crystal.
As to the flash rate I think the only way to have a slower flash is to use a different hertz. I am just unsure which way you would need to go. I think its higher hertz for higher flash rate.
There is no dark side of the moon really, matter of fact its all dark.

Imgur

Ant
Posts: 386
Joined: Tue Nov 19, 2002 8:02 am
Location: Oxford UK
Contact:

Re: LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Post by Ant » Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:27 am

The flash rate of flashing LEDs is fixed and usually around once a second (1 Hz - Hertz is the unit of frequency. 1 Hz = 1 oscillation per second. 100Hz = 100 oscillations per second)

is the 3mm to big in diameter, or too tall? If it's too tall, you might want to look at SMDs in a PLCC-2 package. This around 3.5mm x 3mm square, but only about 2mm tall. it's relatively easy to solder wires to still. Once you get into the smaller sizes 1206, 0805, 0604 then attaching wires becomes a significant issue.

EVApodman
Posts: 2249
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 8:37 am

Re: LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Post by EVApodman » Sat Aug 12, 2017 11:49 am

modelbldr_207582 wrote:
Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:12 pm
I just received them in the mail today and they work great. My problem is the Red and Green LEDs that Blink/Flash are too fast. I want to slow them down so they Blink/Flash 4 to 6 times a minute rather than off and on, which is much faster than I expected.

I'm wondering if I need to restrict the flow of current to slow the rate of Blink/Flash to a slower pace. I also have discovered that the 3 mm are to big for areas such as the saucer section. I will have to reduce the size to SMD where they will fit better into the tight area that I had in mind. I will be trying it again to be sure but the 3 mm are not as small and I thought they would be. If you're doing 1/2500 then you should be getting Micro or Nano SMDs for the builds you're doing. I don't think 3 mm will fit for your desired intentions.

I ordered these LED supplies on Thursday and and received them today. I thought that the paint would get her before the LED but that order is being processed.
Wanting LED to flash at a certain rate is where you start to get into electronics to control them.
"Nothing to do now but drink a beer and watch the universe die."
"Basically what I do everyday."

I AM Spartacus!
I'm Batman.

Don't believe everything you see on the Internet!- Abraham Lincoln

Oh my God!! It's full of plastic peanuts!

modelbldr_207582
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:19 pm

Re: LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Post by modelbldr_207582 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:40 pm

I ordered these LEDs hoping I could avoid having to use a 555 Timer Chip, something I hoped to avoid. Sadly this in not the case. I now have to go into the electronic field I hoped to shy away from. I don't fear it as I consider it as a learning experience that will help me in the future with other builds

Thank you for your reply, it was more helpful than you know

EVApodman
Posts: 2249
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 8:37 am

Re: LEDs & Other Low voltage, Low power lighting

Post by EVApodman » Sun Aug 13, 2017 11:12 am

A 555 chip isn't always necessary as seen here:
http://www.instructables.com/id/No-CPU- ... ulse-fade/
"Nothing to do now but drink a beer and watch the universe die."
"Basically what I do everyday."

I AM Spartacus!
I'm Batman.

Don't believe everything you see on the Internet!- Abraham Lincoln

Oh my God!! It's full of plastic peanuts!

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests