Paint Removal.

This is the place to get answers about painting, weathering and other aspects of finishing a model.

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Thomas E. Johnson
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Post by Thomas E. Johnson » Mon May 05, 2008 12:29 am

Is there an "off the shelf" brand in a spray can that I can go to some place like Lowes or Home Depot to get, that works very fast (like in 30 minutes) at removing paint with a minimum amount of scrubbing, but won't effect the spot glazing putty and superglue thats holding all the fiberglass and resin parts together?
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marconiusrex24
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Remove paint safely from clear styrene

Post by marconiusrex24 » Sun Sep 07, 2008 7:12 pm

I may have just missed it...but did anyone answer the question about removing paint from clear styrene? I have a large clear styrene piece that I want to remove Tamiya Spray paint, Tamiya acryic paint and Testors enamel paint...bascially need to start over.


What is the best product to use to remove the paint without melting the styrene or jeaporizing the transparency of the clear acryilic?

Thanks.

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Saturn
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Post by Saturn » Tue Sep 09, 2008 11:38 am

Castrol Super Clean (or just Super Clean) auto degreaser works without melting/crazing clear styrene.
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Butters
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Post by Butters » Fri Nov 28, 2008 3:13 am

I need to strip acrlyic off of a resin model I have. What can I use that will take off the acrlyic and not attack the resin?
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Post by Andrew Gorman » Fri Nov 28, 2008 3:26 am

Ammonia should do the trick, or any other paint stripper.

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PetarB
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Post by PetarB » Thu Jan 01, 2009 6:27 pm

I need to remove lacquer from resin. I'm leery of using lacquer thinner to do this, as I'm not sure if it will attack the resin. I often use Easy-Off for acrylics but it sounds like it's not so good for lacquers?
Any suggestions?

jafo
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Post by jafo » Tue Feb 24, 2009 9:34 pm

someone did a test on the most common ones
hope this helps
http://www.bonediggers.com/1-3/strip/strip.html

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starmanmm
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Post by starmanmm » Fri Mar 06, 2009 8:59 pm

I have an old AMT D7 that I would like to strip.

The paint used was Floquil RR paint (painted the kit 20 plus years ago).

Recommendations as to what to strip it with?

jafo
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Post by jafo » Fri Mar 06, 2009 10:49 pm

The post right above yours has a link
I think that will answer your question.

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starmanmm
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Post by starmanmm » Sat Mar 07, 2009 11:56 am

Did look at it first.

Failed to notice my type of paint being referenced, which is why I stated the paint on my kit.

Have used EO in the past on acrylic... but I guess that I will use it also on this kit.

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Joseph Osborn
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Post by Joseph Osborn » Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:41 pm

starmanmm wrote:I have an old AMT D7 that I would like to strip.

The paint used was Floquil RR paint (painted the kit 20 plus years ago).

Recommendations as to what to strip it with?
That's the old lacquer paint, right? I'd try Castrol Super Clean and if that didn't work, maybe some brake fluid. If you can still find the old Easy-Off oven cleaner that eats your skin and kills you with its fumes, try that. Any of these three won't hurt the styrene (much).

I have some soy-based screen cleaner that is meant to clean solvent-based screen printing ink. It's called "Wash Away" from Franmar. It works great on lacquer ink, so I'll try it on some lacquer paint soon and report the results.

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starmanmm
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Post by starmanmm » Sat Mar 07, 2009 5:28 pm

Yeah, it is the old lacquer paint.

Thanks to all for the suggestions.

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Kylwell
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Post by Kylwell » Tue Apr 28, 2009 9:34 am

Just wanted to add, if you're using Simple Green to strip parts remove all the metal part before the dunk. Simple Green will blacken them over time, corrodes some metal types and generally makes a mess of things. Stripped the zinc off a piece of galvanized steel.
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jafo
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Post by jafo » Tue Apr 28, 2009 3:14 pm

all work well except on tamiya spray, i have found nothing works except laquer thinner which is too hot
if anyone else has an idea please let me know

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starmanmm
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Post by starmanmm » Mon Apr 26, 2010 6:32 pm

Ya got me on that one. :?
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rallymodeller
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Post by rallymodeller » Sun May 02, 2010 12:00 pm

Got a weird one I'll throw in the ring for paint stripping, but bear in mind it comes with some caveats:

Automotive brake fluid. The thing about brake fluid is that once the bottle is opened, it must be used right away or it is no longer good for putting in your brake system. You see, it's hydrophilic and will absorb moisture out of the air -- increasing its compressibility and will also rust your brake system out from the inside. I do brakes a lot -- I change the pads on my racer at least twice a year and always have some left over.

However, one of its notorious side effects is that it will literally eat the paint right off your car if spilled on the bodywork. Knowing this, I tried it on an old model some years ago -- worked awesome! It's also the best thing I have found for stripping chrome off styrene. It is the best thing I have found for old paint -- the Nuclear Option when nothing else works.

Now for the caution part. Mainly, treat it as you would oven cleaner. Also:

1: NEVER use it on AMT plastic. For some reason it does weird things to the formulation AMT uses. I was stripping the chrome off an AMT Datsun 510 and it caused the plastic to curl up as if it had been heated.

2: ALWAYS wear gloves. As it absorbs water, it heats up. You can feel this -- I know this from working on real cars.

3. Soaking works best, but keep an eye on it. Works as fast as oven cleaner, sometimes faster depending on the paint. Use a PET container or something else non-reactive to contain the fluid.

4. SCRUB the part with soap and water and let completely dry (24+ hours) before repainting. It will come back and bite you after, again like oven cleaner.

4. NEVER use on metal. Metal absorbs the brake fluid and paint will never stick right again.

I have used it for spot removal with good results. Just be sure to corral it somehow (taping the area or whatever). Let it sit until it begins to peel, then scrub with a toothbrush under running water. Clean thoroughly then repaint.

Because it can be finicky, test it first
Haven't tried it with resin, but I can't see why it would be a problem.
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Dennis S.
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Desolving Lacquer

Post by Dennis S. » Fri Dec 17, 2010 1:08 pm

Watch out when you do panel lining not to use Testors enamel thinner. I found out by accident that Testors enamel thinner takes off all brands of laquer. It completely desolved the Tamiya Paint and the Model Master Lacquer clearcoat I used to protect it. I had to repaint the effected areas of my Gundam. Several hours of work down the drain.:evil:

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Oroka
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Post by Oroka » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:36 pm

I have used 99% Isopropyl Alcohol, left to soak for a day or so, and scrubbed with a tooth brush.

I have also used 'Oxyclean' stain removing treatment in water. Seems to work okay, less fumes than the alcohol.

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Post by Grouncontrol » Tue Jul 26, 2011 5:47 pm

I've just read through these posts and have only one question- I am working on a pl 1/350 enterprise and am unhappy with my paint job on the VIP lounge and would like to strip it down and repaint it. My question is, I used both acrylic and enamel paints and am wondering if soaking the part in brake fluid will remove both kinds of paint.
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Post by ulvdemon » Thu Jan 31, 2013 4:49 pm

I can definitely say that Simple green worked. Had issues stripping the paint off of my AMT/Ertl MF. Oven cleaner took off most of it but the area that was really caked on with 3 different colors layered on the back end. Soaked it with some Simple Green and used a "chisel" once it was softened up to remoev the paint. Have most of the paint off now, just some small spots that need to be worked on and then cleaned.
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Captain Riker
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Post by Captain Riker » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:58 pm

I'm still confused so ill risk the dumb question.

I used a Tayima Lacquer paint on model and it wouldn't cover after several coats and dimpled in some areas. I figured the parts weren't clean enough so I want to strip and try again.

Simple Green didn't do anything.

Will easy off work? Do I have to use the skin pealing super clean stuff? I read mineral spirits will work too. It's a resin kit.

Thanks,

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Post by ulvdemon » Tue Feb 05, 2013 8:50 am

Easy off should do it, but I will definitely stress the need to wear gloves, old clothes, and eye protection. That stuff can be nasty on the skin. The Simple Green did well on most of the paint except for the Krylon white on my model.

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Post by nanook177 » Fri Jul 04, 2014 1:25 pm

I don't know if this is the right thread, but what would be a good brush to remove softened paint. I've had my Excelsior soaking for a week in Simple Green and the paint is now soft enough to remove with a fingernail, which I was able to do for a while. However, it would be so much easier with a brush that was stiff enough to remove the paint but soft enough to not hurt the styrene. Suggestions?

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Kylwell
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Post by Kylwell » Fri Jul 04, 2014 2:29 pm

Old toothbrush and a larger plastic bristled brush.
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crowe-t
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Post by crowe-t » Sat May 30, 2015 11:12 pm

Will 91% Isopropyl Alcohol remove primer, Tamiya Fine Surface Primer in particular?

Will 91% Isopropyl Alcohol soften or remove glued joints?

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crowe-t
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Post by crowe-t » Sun May 31, 2015 3:27 pm

I tested 91% Isopropyl Alcohol on the Tamiya Fine Surface Primer and it worked nicely.

I had used Super Clean a while ago to remove paint and it did not remove the Tamiya primer. Super Clean is also toxic.

91% Isopropyl Alcohol is definitely the way to go. The smell isn't bad at all and it goes away very quickly. It seems to remove all paints including Tamiya primer and doesn't harm anything.

I'll never use Super Clean again to remove paint.

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