Advanced. Weathering. Pastels

This is the place to get answers about painting, weathering and other aspects of finishing a model.

Moderators: DasPhule, Moderators

User avatar
starmanmm
Posts: 2503
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2002 12:59 am
Location: New Bedford, MA

Post by starmanmm » Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:44 pm

Thanks for the info.... not cheap I see, but good to know what I am now looking for.

User avatar
Dukat, S.G.
Posts: 2938
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2002 4:39 pm
Location: Cardassia Prime

Post by Dukat, S.G. » Fri Jun 05, 2009 5:07 pm

Gents,

I'm trying to blend three different powder colors: a yellow, black and a blue-green. The goal's to wind up with a dark yellow-green.

I've not had much luck, though. It seems every time I get the stuff wet (I'm using Windex; I can explain the madness behind that later!), it either dries almost black or a shade VERY close to the pre-mixed green.

This is puzzling. Granted, the work I did today was a bit hurried: I needed to hit the road and I think I'm coming down with something to boot :-|

I guess what I'm asking is, am I wasting time trying to blend colors, or do I need to just be more patient about the process? :)

Thanks!
"Cardassians do like to talk. I suppose
it can be a failing, at times."-- Dukat

(My real name's Sean Robertson. Don't let the scales and alter-ego fool you ;D.)

goettervonkobol
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 7:06 am

Post by goettervonkobol » Mon Jun 15, 2009 4:40 am

You can use watercolors when the modelpaint is "clammy" then it will hold nice... if the modelpaint is dry, you can change it (very easy) with water until it looks like you want. very cheap very nice. I advise you to use a dark brown.

jdeleonardis
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2009 11:49 pm

Post by jdeleonardis » Tue Jul 21, 2009 1:48 pm

Have any of you ever used the weathering system from Bragdon Enterprises?http://www.bragdonent.com/weather.htm (Ive done some searches here on the site, and dont see it mentioned - apologies if I have missed it!)

It seems like it might be interesting stuff

User avatar
Jonas Calhoun
Posts: 1933
Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2003 6:12 pm
Location: The Hunting Grounds.

Post by Jonas Calhoun » Tue Jul 21, 2009 4:31 pm

It's got some adhesive in the powders. I use them all the time...

Dan
"Laugh while you can, monkey boy!" -- Lord John Whorfin

jdeleonardis
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2009 11:49 pm

Post by jdeleonardis » Mon Oct 05, 2009 7:39 am

I purchased some of the bragdon powders, and I really like the result I got with them. Can they have dullcoat painted over the top of them???

Starfleetsof
Posts: 58
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 10:19 pm

Battle Damage: Scorch Marks

Post by Starfleetsof » Sat Dec 17, 2011 2:02 am

I see people have been commenting about using pastels for weathering. I am going to be building a Galaxy-class starship model that will involve a number of battle damaged areas. Part of that is scorching around the damaged areas. I have heard that pastels are a good way to go, and some people use an air brush. I am not very familiar how to really make either technique work or which technique is best.

Are there any suggestions on which I should use?

User avatar
Kylwell
Moderator
Posts: 28826
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2003 9:25 pm
Location: Lakewood, CO
Contact:

Post by Kylwell » Sat Dec 17, 2011 10:55 am

Pastels are easier to master and mistakes are easier to fix than an airbrush. Airbrushed marks are more permanent.
Abolish Alliteration

christrom
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2010 1:15 pm
Location: GB

Post by christrom » Fri Jan 04, 2013 6:41 am

I've had a lot of success with using pastels as a filter on models. I've airbrushed most of the weathering with acrylics and then made a mix of pastels with water with a tiny bit of hand soap. I apply these as you would a watercolour wash, thinned heavily, liberally over the dried acrylic airbrushing, and I've dropped in various colours while the surface is still wet.

Once dry, the pastels stick really well (possibly because I don't tend to sand my paintjobs). Areas can be removed by scrubbing with a damp cotton swab, or even a pencil eraser used gently.

Pastels for me work better than watercolour because the pigment is more coarse and is easier to move around. It does an excellent job of subtly dirtying up a model. Try it, you may love it! - No oils for me :)

User avatar
Kylwell
Moderator
Posts: 28826
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2003 9:25 pm
Location: Lakewood, CO
Contact:

Post by Kylwell » Fri Jan 04, 2013 10:50 am

I swing both ways and feel that it all depends on the look I want. Nothing simulates dust like pastels (huh, I wonder why?) but oil run the roost for fine detail enhancement (i.e. a wash).

I've recently been working with Holbien's new line of oils and they are the finest I've ever worked with. Damned near like night & day compared to student grade oils.
Abolish Alliteration

User avatar
starmanmm
Posts: 2503
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2002 12:59 am
Location: New Bedford, MA

Post by starmanmm » Fri Jan 04, 2013 8:51 pm

christrom... I don't understand this statement....

"and I've dropped in various colours while the surface is still wet."
Are you adding more pastels over the mixture as it dries?
"Things fall apart... It's Scientific" Talking Heads

christrom
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2010 1:15 pm
Location: GB

Post by christrom » Sat Jan 05, 2013 3:53 pm

Yeah, that's right - The pastel solution is very watery and while it is still damp I have other pre mixed slightly stronger tones and paint these directly on top, allowing them to run and flow.

I'm a watercolourist by nature, so wanted to be able to do this on my models. The secret is to use plenty of water, and if you are covering a large flat piece you want to hold the model at about 30 degrees from horizontal, so when you apply the watery solution it naturally flows all in one direction. You start from the top and work your way to the bottom in horizontal strokes. You will end up with a little reservoir of paint at the bottom where it all collects and all you do then is get a dry brush or cotton swab (Q-tip) to soak up the accumulated water. This way you avoid weird shapes forming when it dries. Remember to leave the model at this angle until dry. It sounds complicated but it is a very well-known watercolour painting technique.

I have tried this with watercolour but have found that because watercolour is so finely ground it is difficult to control. Because pastel scrapings are a little thicker, they tend to 'stay' better and you can move the particles around with your brush more effectively.

The BEST bit about this though is going back once it is dry with an eraser. It is just like removing pencil and you can either lighten it ever so slighty by adding a little pressure, or near enough remove it totally using more pressure. Better still, take a knife to the eraser and cut some really sharp shapes and you can get some really accurate, crisp erasing.

User avatar
starmanmm
Posts: 2503
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2002 12:59 am
Location: New Bedford, MA

Post by starmanmm » Sat Jan 05, 2013 4:34 pm

This technic sounds like an interesting class for WF. Hint, hint, hint. :wink:
"Things fall apart... It's Scientific" Talking Heads

christrom
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2010 1:15 pm
Location: GB

Post by christrom » Sat Jan 05, 2013 4:52 pm

Sorry, I'm being thick - what is 'WF'? :oops:

User avatar
Kylwell
Moderator
Posts: 28826
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2003 9:25 pm
Location: Lakewood, CO
Contact:

Post by Kylwell » Sat Jan 05, 2013 5:41 pm

Wonderfest

Not to be confused with Wonder Festival...
Abolish Alliteration

christrom
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2010 1:15 pm
Location: GB

Post by christrom » Sat Jan 05, 2013 6:30 pm

I got you, bit far for me (uk) but I may put together a video :)

User avatar
starmanmm
Posts: 2503
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2002 12:59 am
Location: New Bedford, MA

Post by starmanmm » Sat Jan 05, 2013 6:34 pm

That would be cool.

Post it on YouTube and drop the link back here! :D
"Things fall apart... It's Scientific" Talking Heads

nkuzmik
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:44 pm
Location: Ugh. Don't remind me.

Re: Advanced. Weathering. Pastels

Post by nkuzmik » Sun Jul 02, 2017 7:32 am

Any advice on removing pastel from bare plastic?

I used some Tamiya black pastel to put some smutz in the thruster port of a GUNPLA kit but got some where I didn't want it. Tried water and alcohol, topically not internally. Now my white panel has a kind of uniform dinge, which I'll have to remember for later, but not the look I was going for this time.

Any suggestions?
Don't pay too much attention to me. I'm rarely right... Except when I am...

User avatar
TER-OR
Site Admin
Posts: 10525
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2002 7:05 pm
Location: Conjugate imprecision of time negates absolute determination of location.
Contact:

Re: Advanced. Weathering. Pastels

Post by TER-OR » Fri Jul 07, 2017 12:39 pm

A bit of soap and scrub with a soft toothbrush maybe?
Raised by wolves, tamed by nuns, padded for your protection.

Terry Miesle
Never trust anyone who says they don't have a hobby.
Quando Omni Flunkus Moratati

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests