Basics. Airbrushing.

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USS Atlantis
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Post by USS Atlantis » Thu May 12, 2011 7:29 pm

James Tiberius Kirk wrote:what is the best I can use for Tamiya paints to thin through an airbrush?

Isopropyl Alcohol? Water? Distilled Water?!
I'd also stick with the Tamiya thinner, JT - unlike Testors, Tamiya seems to know what they're doing with acrylics and the thinners for them
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Post by kenbadger » Sun Feb 05, 2012 3:59 pm

justcrash wrote:
TER-OR wrote:Get a new tip. Buy a couple while you're doing so. The tip will wear down over time, and you may not notice until you try to do precision work. A worn tip may be OK for area coverage, but not fine control.

A cracked tip - is garbage. You wil have no control.
hey Ter, how can you tell when your tip is worn?
view it under a magnification lens. If you notice a 'flaring' or hairline fracture it should be changed.
TAKE AIR
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Post by kenbadger » Sun Feb 05, 2012 4:05 pm

Here's our top ten troubleshooting topics for just about any airbrush.

1) Bubbling in color reservoir (color cup or jar). When this occurs it is the result of air entering
into the paint channel. This concern can have several causes; the most common are a bad seal
somewhere in the nozzle, tip dry, incorrect spray regulator/air cap alignment, or a split paint tip.
-If a bad nozzle seal is the cause, in the case of a threaded paint tip nozzle, make certain the paint tip
thread is properly sealed with beeswax or other sufficient sealing agent. In the case of a drop in paint
tip nozzle, make certain the paint tip is properly seated in the angled recess of the airbrush body, and
that all surfaces between the two components are cleared of any debris and are not marred or
scratched. Lastly, in the case of airbrushes that require a “head” seal between the nozzle assembly
and the airbrush body, be certain the head seal is in place and is in proper condition to create the
necessary seal at this point of air flow.
-If tip dry is the cause, remove the dried paint from the needle/nozzle tip by either picking it off with
your finger tips/nails or spraying cleaner through the airbrush. If tip dry occurs frequently in your
application it may be helpful to keep a paint brush and small container of water nearby to wet the
nozzle and get your airbrush spraying properly again when necessary. Tip dry will usually occur
more frequently in detail airbrushing applications.
-If you think the bubbling may be occurring due to incorrect spray regulator/air cap alignment, tighten
or loosen your spray regulator/air cap in ¼ turn or lesser increments to determine if that is the certain
cause of the problem. If it is, your airbrush will stop bubbling and resume spraying as soon as you hit the
spray regulator/air cap’s “sweet spot”.
-If a split paint tip is the cause of the bubbling, the only corrective measure is to replace the paint tip.

2) Off-center spray. This is caused by a bent needle tip. As media exits the airbrush it “rolls” off of
the needle. If the needle is bent it will cause the spray to “lean” to one side or the other. To correct
this problem carefully attempt to straighten the needle tip. A grooved sharpening stone is an effective
device for trying to straighten airbrush needle tips. If you are unable to straighten the needle tip, a
replacement needle will need to be installed to correct the off-center spray concern.

3) Spray will not shut off and/or occurs without sliding the trigger back. This concern can have
several causes; the most common are improper seating of the needle in the paint tip, a “flared” paint tip, or partial tip dry.
-If the needle is not seated properly in the paint tip, it is necessary to re-seat it. To do so access and
loosen the needle chuck, slide the needle forward until it stops and seats in the paint tip, and retighten the needle chuck. DO NOT USE FORCE when seating the needle in the paint tip, when it
stops it should be seated properly.
-If the spray will not shut off due to a flared tip, it is necessary to replace the paint tip.
-If the spray will not shut off because of partial tip dry/clogging remove the dried paint from the
needle/nozzle tip by either picking it off with your finger tips/nails or spraying cleaner through the
airbrush.

4) Spray pattern pulsation. This concern can have several causes; the most common are a bad
seal (usually one that cannot be trained to properly play well with other seals, LOL, just kidding – we
do have a sense of humor though), inconsistent media viscosity (usually paint being too thick), or an
inadequate or improperly performing air compressor.
-A bad seal can occur anywhere air could potentially leak from while traveling from the air source
through the airbrush. Although some low levels of air leakage are common, and may not adversely
affect an airbrush’s spray performance, if you are experiencing a pulsation in your airbrush’s spray
pattern, you should check all threaded parts and seals to ensure there is no excessive air leakage at
any of these points. Airbrushes that require a “head” seal between the nozzle assembly and the
airbrush body may leak air, causing a pulsating spray, if the head seal is not properly in place. If this
occurs it is advisable to reposition or replace the “head” seal. Additionally, many airbrushes have
inner seals (inside of the airbrush body) that the needle passes through. These seals are designed to
make sure paint is properly directed to the airbrush nozzle and does not flow to the rear of the
airbrush. If the airbrush’s inner seal is broken, it can also cause a pulsating spray. To fix a bad inner
seal it is necessary to replace it. In many instances this seal replacement is best done at the factory
by the airbrush’s manufacturer. (This is a lifetime warranted part on Badger airbrushes). Lastly,
although not likely to cause a pulsating spray, the hose connections at the airbrush and the air source
should be properly sealed. This can usually be done effectively with the wrapping of Teflon
“plumber’s” tape around the male threaded part.
-If spray pulsation is caused by an inconsistent paint viscosity, the paint should be adjusted to proper
spraying viscosity. It is also important to make sure that paint is properly blended so that pigment is
evenly distributed through the paint to ensure spray consistency. The rule of thumb for preparing
paints (or other materials) for airbrushing is to reduce them to the approximate visual viscosity of 2%
milk. As starting paint viscosities often vary from color to color, even within a specific paint brand, it is
best to avoid fixed thinning ratios. It is also best to vigorously mix/stir paint, rather than shaking it,
before use. Mixing/stirring paint better blends pigment and base creating a more consistent paint
from the top to the bottom of the bottle. Mixing/stirring paint also causes pigment to re-settle slower.
-If paint pulsation is caused by an inadequate or improperly performing air compressor, it may be
necessary to have the compressor repaired or replaced. Over time air compressors can incur
diminished performance that can adversely affect their performance efficiency. This is especially
noticeable with small “tankless” diaphragm compressors that can present pulsation of the diaphragm
action in an airbrushes spray pattern if the compressor operates inefficiently.

5) Grainy spray. This is caused by paint (or other media) not being properly reduced, meaning it is
too thick to atomize properly, or not operating the airbrush at a high enough pressure.
Paint (or other media) should be the viscosity equivalent of 2% milk to spray properly through an
airbrush. Sparingly add the appropriate thinner to the paint (or other media) until it is the proper
sprayable viscosity. Also check the needle tip and nozzle tip to make sure no tip dry has formed on
the nozzle.
A bottom feed airbrush should have at least 16 PSI (higher for heavier media) while spraying to
operate properly. A gravity feed airbrush can be operated at spray pressures as low as 8 PSI. Check
the pressure you are spraying at to be sure it is high enough for the type of airbrush you are using,
and the type of media you are spraying.

6) Buckling surface. This is caused if paint (or other media) is too thin or “runny” or applied too
heavily on a thin porous substrate (usually a rag type paper). If working close to the surface take
care not slide the airbrush trigger back too far releasing more paint than desired and over saturating
the surface you’re spraying. You should only work close to the surface when wanting to do fine lines, and only sliding the trigger back a little bit. If working with an extremely thin media apply it in fine
coats, letting one coat dry before applying another. This will prevent over saturating your surface and
give you greater control in developing your artwork to your desired end.

7) Paint blobs at the ends of the stroke or barbell patterns. This is caused by sliding the trigger
back before beginning your hand movement and stopping your hand movement before and not
sliding your trigger forward to shut off paint flow before stopping your hand movement. This can only
be remedied by being aware of your triggering and practicing proper triggering techniques. Practice,
practice, practice. Creating a grid of dots (on a blank sheet) with your airbrush – then going back
and connecting the dots, drawing figure eights, and/or simply writing your name with the airbrush all
airbrushing exercises. Using your airbrush to color in coloring books is also a very helpful, skill
developing, method of airbrush practice. Practice, practice, practice.

8) Flared ends or curved stroke. This is caused by turning the wrist at the end of the airbrush
stroke or arcing closer to the surface during the airbrush stroke. Unless these spray pattern effects
are desired, it is important to maintain consistent parallel distance from the surface you are spraying
through your entire airbrush stroke. This again is best corrected by practicing and developing your
skill level and a comfort with how the airbrush works. Creating a grid of dots (on a blank sheet) with
your airbrush – then going back and connecting the dots, drawing figure eights, and/or simply writing
your name with the airbrush are all good airbrushing practice exercises. Coloring in a coloring book
with your airbrush is also a helpful, skill developing, method of airbrush practice. To practice airbrush
technique on three dimensional objects, paint items such as scratch plastic/metal, pop cans, empty
plastic bottles, or other contoured items that are of little or no value.

9) Centipede or spidering spray patterns. This is caused if paint (or other media) is too thin or
“runny” or applied too heavily on a non-porous substrate (metals, plastics, etc.). If working close to
the surface take care not slide the airbrush trigger back too far - releasing more paint than desired.
On hard surfaces excess paint cannot be absorbed and will scatter over the surface in a centipede or
spidering pattern. When wanting to do fine lines and working close to the surface you should only
slide the trigger back a little bit to release a small amount of media. If working with an extremely thin
media apply it in fine coats and let one coat dry before applying another to avoid a “scattering” effect
when air (and additional paint) passes back through still wet paint. The probability of this undesired
effect is increased if spraying your airbrush at too high of an air pressure, so check to make sure your
air pressure is properly set for the type of airbrush you are using, the media you are spraying, and the
type of surface you are finishing.

10) Dot blotching or splattering at the start of end of spraying. This is caused by an incorrect
triggering technique of stopping air flow (releasing downward trigger pressure) before turning off paint
flow (sliding trigger/needle forward to close off paint tip). By turning air flow off before paint flow, paint
goes around the needle and “floods” the nozzle. The result of this “flooding” is either one of two
things. 1. As the needle returns forward upon releasing the trigger, it pushes the paint that has
flooded the paint tip out in a burst or splatter of blotched dots. 2. If possibility 1 does not occur the
“flooded” paint remains in the nozzle and is blown out in a burst or splatter of blotched dots when the
trigger is depressed to resume airbrushing. This is another technique issue that can be prevented by
learning and developing proper triggering technique. Remember to carefully slide the trigger back
forward to stop paint flow, don’t let it “snap” back.
The only thing that you cannot be taught is practice. The more you practice your airbrushing the
greater your airbrush skills will become and the more your airbrushing confidence and enjoyment will
increase. (See tip #8 above for a few recommended triggering practice techniques
TAKE AIR
Ken 'Badger' Schlotfeldt
Mark 10:27
BADGER/Thayer & Chandler
American Made Airbrush Excellence
www.BadgerAirBrush.com

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Post by USS Atlantis » Sun Feb 05, 2012 4:40 pm

Ken

Great tips there and thanks for posting that - even after 30+ years with my old, reliable model 200, I can still use all the help I can get

Have fun in Deutschland :)
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Post by kenbadger » Mon Feb 06, 2012 1:45 am

USS Atlantis wrote:Ken

Great tips there and thanks for posting that - even after 30+ years with my old, reliable model 200, I can still use all the help I can get

Have fun in Deutschland :)
Geez - I might have actually put your 200 together. :shock:
TAKE AIR
Ken 'Badger' Schlotfeldt
Mark 10:27
BADGER/Thayer & Chandler
American Made Airbrush Excellence
www.BadgerAirBrush.com

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Post by TER-OR » Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:09 pm

Thanks a bunch, Ken. And I stil use my Omni as my workhorse airbrush.
Raised by wolves, tamed by nuns, padded for your protection.

Terry Miesle
Never trust anyone who says they don't have a hobby.
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Post by chiver » Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:36 pm

so i have tryed air brushing for the first time and liked it, alot. i baught a little starter kit and it uses the cans for propelant. not pleased with the can( it couldnt keep up) i lost pressure and the paint began to slpater on the model. so now i am looking to getting an air compressor, and air gun. have no idea what i should get and whats good or not. i priced some compressors one was a aztec no 50204 for $149.99 and the other was a windstorm for about $170. is the aztec compressor a good one? or should i look at getting a bigger compressor thati can put a regulator on so i can use it for other things too? i know nothing when it comes to air brushes. i have been reading this page and am learning alot. but i still dont know the difference between a single stage or a dubble action air brush. i do know the differene between gravity and sphyon feed. any help or sugestions?

thanks in advance
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Post by chiver » Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:37 pm

also i dont knwo if it maters any but i use model masters enamel paints. and have been using a 2 paint : 1 thinner mix. seams to be working with this cheepo brush
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Post by starmanmm » Sun Mar 04, 2012 12:22 am

chiver wrote:
aztec compressor a good one? or should i look at getting a bigger compressor thati can put a regulator on so i can use it for other things too? i know nothing when it comes to air brushes. i have been reading this page and am learning alot. but i still dont know the difference between a single stage or a dubble action air brush. i do know the differene between gravity and sphyon feed. any help or sugestions?
Seeing that you are just starting out, if some noise is not an issue, go to Wal Mart and look for the Campbell Hausfeld 3-Gallon Compressor. It goes for around $75 bucks and that is what I first used until I got my silent air compressor. If you get this... also get a water trap for the line.

Down and dirty: the difference between a single and double action AB is that the double action means you control both the air and paint - depending on whether you press the trigger down or back/forward.

As you press down on the trigger - that control the paint. As you pull back on the trigger- it regulates how much air flows thru the AB.
also i dont knwo if it maters any but i use model masters enamel paints. and have been using a 2 paint : 1 thinner mix. seams to be working with this cheepo brush
Like everything with an AB, you have to find a mixture formula to work with the paints you are using. Mostly, this is trial and error.

If you look at the threads on Finishing - there you will find info on compressors, airbrushes, how some people mix their stuff.

It's almost 12:30am, so I'm a bit tired but I think I have covered this more or less correctly.
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Post by chiver » Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:23 am

it dose thank you. and just to dubble check i need to find a compressor that can dial down to between 5-10 psi right? or at least a regulator that i can dial down.
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Post by Kylwell » Mon Mar 05, 2012 12:47 pm

Yes. Depending on where you are a moisture trap is also helpful. An auto shut-off also helps keep the compressor from overheating.
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Post by nicholassagan » Mon May 21, 2012 9:39 am

Hey guys, I picked this compressor up recently
http://www.modelexpo-online.com/product ... EMNO=AS186

Its really nice and quiet, too. Except I can't get the valve to hold/stop at any given pressure. It will stay steady NEAR a pressure but the engine wont shut off at that point, which its supposed to do :( And there are no leaks along the hose/brush line...

Any suggestions?

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Post by Kylwell » Mon May 21, 2012 10:36 am

Change the regulator out is all I can think of.
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Post by Scott Hasty » Mon May 21, 2012 11:13 am

Or make sure the tank condensation drain is tightly closed...
I am fearful when I see people substituting fear for reason

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Post by nicholassagan » Mon May 21, 2012 12:15 pm

Thanks guys...I'll test that out now...

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Post by starmanmm » Mon May 21, 2012 4:07 pm

How big of a tank do we have there? 1 or 2 gallon tank?

Not seeing anything in the description.
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Post by nicholassagan » Mon May 21, 2012 4:35 pm

Oh, it's 1/2 gallon. BUT!!!!

It's working now. I just had to tweak the regulator valve. :roll:

My game just stepped up a notch. :8)

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Post by chiver » Wed Feb 20, 2013 3:33 pm

i'm still new to air brushing, mine is starting to stick and not work, i can pull the needle back but it wont go forward, and when it does it very slow. i clean it after every use and take it apart to clean, should i be oiling it or anyhting if so what kind of oil? i dotn know if it makes much of a difference but its an internal mixture
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Post by starmanmm » Wed Feb 20, 2013 7:35 pm

Need a little more info... like what kind of AB and what have you been spraying with it? Also, how have you been cleaning it (taking it apart, windex, etc.).
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Post by chiver » Fri Feb 22, 2013 12:01 am

It's a Campbell hausfeld. And I've been as praying model masters enamels with it.i take it apart and clean it completely right after every use
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Post by Kylwell » Fri Feb 22, 2013 12:12 am

Front & back end?

Could be a sticky slider on the return spring but that usually only happens if you've dunked it in paint.

Which means an o-ring may be out of whack.
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Post by chiver » Fri Feb 22, 2013 10:31 am

I checked the spring and its working perfict, but its the needed in the gun it's self that its sticking, is it safe to put a little bit of oil near the back of the needle?
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Post by chiver » Fri Feb 22, 2013 10:32 am

Back before where the air is
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Post by Kylwell » Fri Feb 22, 2013 11:44 am

Depends on what the o-ring is made of. Standard petroleum based oils will degrade a lot of materials. If you've got some pure silicone based light oil I'd give that a try.
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Post by chiver » Fri Feb 22, 2013 12:45 pm

Lol the only oil I have is gun oil. I have it working for now we'll see what happens when I clean it again
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Recommendations for instructional videos?

Post by rmitchis » Wed May 22, 2013 6:32 pm

Looking for some good airbrush videos that deal with specifically sci ti subjects. I've been on an extended hiatus but I'm hoping to get back to building soon and my skills have become rusty.

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Post by Kylwell » Wed May 22, 2013 9:30 pm

Have you been introduced to the term "bitch kit"?
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Post by Saturn » Thu May 23, 2013 9:26 am

Funny, I used to call em' painting hulks.
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Post by Kylwell » Thu May 23, 2013 11:35 am

Yeah but bitch kit is so much funnier
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Post by nicholjm » Fri Feb 14, 2014 1:51 pm

So I have an Iwata Eclipse HP-CS now, and it is a wonderful precision machine. It's one the few really high quality tools I have in my possession. I mean, I have a guitar, but it's a cheap Ibanez. I have power tools, but they are basic Black&Deckers or Ryobi's. But this....THIS is an Iwata! It's capabilities far outweigh my own skill level.

Anyways, how do you guys clean out your gravity-fed ABs? I'm talking, the kind of cleaning where you're done with your session, and putting the airbrush up for maybe weeks at a time. I never have to airbrush more than one color in a session. Here's what I do, please tell me if I can leave some steps out or become more efficient anywhere:

1. Pour out any leftover paint that is in the gravity cup.
2. Wipe out what paint I can from the cup using a paper towel.
3. Fill the cup with Windex, and spray this straight onto a paper towel at a slightly higher pressure, until the spray is basically clear (no paint).
4. Disconnect the hose, take AB over to sink.
5. Remove the "back end" parts: the trigger and stuff, and set aside. These never have paint on them.
6. Pull the needle out the back. Wipe it down with my fingers and Windex, then rinse off in sink. Set aside to air dry.
7. Using the wrench, unscrew the front end of the AB. Hold the nozzle and the tiny piece the needle nose seats in (what's it called?) in my hand, and pour a little Windex on them. Swish them around a little in it.
8. Gently rinse them off in water. Set aside to air dry.
9. Flush water thru the cup and thru the body of the airbrush thoroughly. Set aside to air dry.

That's basically it. Am I over doing it? Seems like 1/2 my session is cleaning the AB at the end. Is this normal? I'm very paranoid about ruining this fine tool.

Also, why is there a cut-out in the barrel at the back end of the HP-CS? I can pinch the back of the needle and pull it back. What technique requires this?
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