How do you remove stickum from a painted surface?

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Cydonia
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How do you remove stickum from a painted surface?

Post by Cydonia » Sun Mar 20, 2016 12:48 pm

Building a resin kit using Model Color and Tamiya acrylics. I masked off large areas with vinyl and prepared frisket film. The vinyl worked great, but l didn't notice until afterward that the frisket was a high tack. The result was areas of stickiness that cannot be removed by simply rolling or washing it off. I've also tried a small amount of GooGone on a small area, but this did not do much to remove the adhesive and was rather hard to remove the cleaner itself. And l believe alcohol would remove the paint even if used sparingly.

What is the best way to remove stickum from an acrylic surface without damaging the paint?
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Lt. Z0mBe
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Post by Lt. Z0mBe » Tue Mar 22, 2016 12:05 pm

What about turpentine and/or mineral spirits? Failing that I think you're down to freezing it and scraping it off or sanding it off with a touch up afterwards.

I hope this helps.

Kenny

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Cydonia
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Post by Cydonia » Tue Mar 22, 2016 6:22 pm

Hmm, freezing... :-k :-k
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Wug
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Post by Wug » Tue Mar 22, 2016 7:30 pm

Lamp oil usually works better than Goo Gone but I don't know if it will damgae the paint.

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Post by seam-filler » Wed Mar 23, 2016 3:01 am

Personally, I've had no problem using IPA (isopropyl alcohol) on acrylic painted surfaces as long as the paint has had a few days to cure.

I just apply it sparingly with a soft cloth or (in fiddly areas) a Q-tip and rub gently. I keep a fairly damp cloth nearby to wash away the IPA when done.
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Cydonia
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Post by Cydonia » Wed Mar 23, 2016 2:46 pm

Nope, the paint has cured for two weeks and the slightest swipe of IPA took some of the paint off without touching the stickum.
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Post by gsb5w » Wed Mar 23, 2016 4:20 pm

Paint thinner is not supposed to affect acrylics so if it were me I would give it a try.
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Cydonia
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Post by Cydonia » Thu Mar 24, 2016 3:48 pm

And we have a winner! Enamel paint thinner.

It took up a very small amount of acrylic, but not enough to ruin it. Rubbed it on with a Q-tip, wiped it off with the other end. Nice and clean, no residue and the excess thinner simply evaporated.

I use enamels so rarely now that l totally forgot about the stuff. It now has a new purpose. \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/ \:D/
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Post by Kylwell » Fri Mar 25, 2016 10:55 pm

Lighter fluid or Goof Off (which can be lighter fluid).
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Post by srspicer » Tue Apr 26, 2016 3:26 pm

An excellent generic universal adhesive remover is Coleman fuel. No adhesive has ever resisted it, and does not attack most paints & finishes.

I have use it on the paper labels with adhesive backing. Let the stuff soak a bit and gently work the surface and you will have success.

With most chemicals, too much of a good thing will ruin anything, but I have had great success with this stuff. Remember, it has carcinogens in it, so wear gloves and use a fan w/respirator!!!!! :!:

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Post by jafo » Tue May 03, 2016 11:27 am

I have used WD-40 on a cotton swab works great and doesnt mess with the paint.

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