Resin model construction

Got a question about techniques, materials or other aspects of physically building a model? This is the place to ask.

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TER-OR
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Resin model construction

Post by TER-OR » Thu Jan 05, 2006 11:23 pm

I dun bought this neato resin model. How do I build it?
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Post by Less Than Super Ostrich » Wed Jan 18, 2006 2:45 pm

I think an underappreciated step in resin kit building is pinning the subject. Drill holes in the parts, insert a paperclip sized rod, and glue with CA (superglue). It's a step that is very important especially since a resin kit can be very heavy.


Also, another reference
http://www.smallartworks.ca/Articles/Ti ... ltips.html
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Post by Spacephrawg » Sat Jul 15, 2006 12:03 am

see the trick I've yet to master with pinning is how to make the pin holes line up on both parts. One thing I came up with but i've decided is a tad extravigant is putting a drop of something like ink or even glue on one side, and then pressing hte other part onto the joining surface, then pulling it away. Hopefully a dot of whatever teh stuff was would show up in hte right place on both parts. however, I always thought that method was too roundabout to make sense. Is there a better way to make holes line up? Other than drilling right through from the outside?

Also, is there a glue for resin models that *doesnt* get brittle over time?
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Post by TER-OR » Sat Jul 15, 2006 1:39 pm

I will do this trick sometimes:
Drill holes on one side, place in those cut-off pin with just a small amount protruding from the hole. Carefully piece the parts together so tiny pinholes nick the mating part. That's where you put your hole. You can even then place liners if you want and use a telescoping brass connection for dissembly if you need, or if the resin is soft etc.

Another technique is pure geometry (and carpentry skills). Tape the parts together. Put marks on both top and bottom which hit both parts of the joint. You'll want 4 marks for each pin, two top and two bottom. Take the parts apart, an draw an X between the 4 marks on each side of the mating part. Where the lines intersect is where you place your pin-hole.

A third technique if those don't meet exactly, is to make one hole bigger than the other, fill it with epoxy putty and join the parts. The epoxy putty should mash around the pin and provide great support. A nail with a pronounced head is a great pin in this technique, as that head will be a positive lock. Obviously, you will need to tape the joint together while the epoxy putty cures. The hole should be deep, but doesn't have to be completly filled to accomodate expansion.

I hope these are clear enough - if not, maybe I can take some pictures.
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Post by starmanmm » Tue Aug 01, 2006 7:47 am

I usually use a thread screw, like a sheet rock screw for pinning the larger pieces. One thing that is nice about sheet rock screws is that you can find them in different sizes. The reason why I like to use a threaded screw, is because the thread will prevent the two pieces from pulling apart, thus guaranteeing a very secured connection. If I can do it, I will even wrap fine wire around copper wire to ensure that the piece will not pull out.

As for lining up the pins, what I do is drill one size hole for my pin and drill the hole, across from the pin slightly bigger to allow me some error in lining up the pin. I then fill that hole with lots of thick CA and make the connection. In this case, a soft metal like copper wire works well. I usually get my copper wire from construction sites. The electrical contractors usually leave enough scraps around. But like I said, when I use copper, I will use a fine wire to wrap around the copper to give it grip.

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Post by zaphod » Fri May 04, 2007 12:41 pm

I have some resin parts that I want to drilll little holes in for fibre optics. Any tips in drilling so that I can avoid cracks? I have a pin vise and a chuck I can put in a power drill, and some little tiny drill bits. Is slow better than fast? I have never used bits this size, so I guess I'll use minimal force so zat I do not break ze leetle guys. Not trying to hijack thread, pm if necessary.
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Post by DX-SFX » Fri May 04, 2007 7:13 pm

It's always best to go slow by hand with very tiny drills (less than 1mm) because you can feel how much twist you're applying. Resin is fairly easy to work though. As long as you clear any swarf from the flutes regularly by withdrawing the drill bit, you shouldn't have a problem with drill breakage.

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Post by Kylwell » Fri May 04, 2007 10:16 pm

I have built exactly one resin kit to date.

So I am by far no expert.

But, using the advice given here (pin as much as one can, roughen what surfaces you can, etc) I think I did ok. I used Wave Black CA only, seems to like resin quite a bit, and Mr Resin Primer to prime with (thinned with Mr Leveling Thinner, thank you Blappy for that tip).

Going slow while drilling out holes and frequently clearing the flutes of build-up help. I also found it handy to start small and work my way up, especially with larger holes.

Oh, and Dremels (or other rotary power tools) are a god-send when it comes to carving out chunks of resin.
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Post by TER-OR » Fri May 04, 2007 10:30 pm

Slow, slow, slow!
Small bits in power drills are pretty much guaranteed to snap.
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Post by rpauly » Sat May 05, 2007 10:48 am

Re pinning: Lots of times, I'll glue the parts up, then drill through both of them, insert the pin, and cover up the remaining divot with a little ball of Aves. Smooth it down with a damp finger and it's invisible...
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Post by Kylwell » Sat May 05, 2007 11:05 am

TER-OR wrote:Slow, slow, slow!
Small bits in power drills are pretty much guaranteed to snap.
Yes.

You can manage it but the "take a little bit then pull out to clean the flutes, take a little bite then pull out to clean the flutes" takes about as much time as hand drilling it does.

Get a small spiral drill if you need to go fast. But be warned, even with it you can bind up a small (#75) bit and snap it.
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Post by Kun2112 » Sun Aug 12, 2007 10:53 pm

So, what about surface prep?
I soaked a model in soapy water over night, scrubbed it with a small tooth brush, primed it with Mr. surfacer, and the paint lifts when I mask it.....
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Post by Kylwell » Sun Aug 12, 2007 11:08 pm

Use Mr. Resin Primer. Stronger bite. And a overnight soak in SimpleGreen works the best (I've been told, I'll give it a try tomorrow).
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Post by Kun2112 » Mon Aug 13, 2007 2:06 am

Any other primers? I'm looking at a week + for Mr. Resin Primer, and I am trying to get this finished for sonething.
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Post by Sdf-1 » Mon Aug 13, 2007 2:34 am

Some automotive primer. Self etching is good, may not be good for airbrush, but I use it anyway.

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Post by TER-OR » Mon Aug 13, 2007 8:59 pm

There are some gaming primers out there, Citadel and Reaper both market them. I'm fond of Mr. Surfacer 500 and 1000 as primers. They work great for resin, and don't obscure details (if you don't pour it on). I'm referring to the rattlecans. Expensive, but very good.
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Post by Spacephrawg » Tue Jun 02, 2009 7:00 pm

I read somewhere that just [delicately] scrubbing the heck out of resin parts with mild detergent is enough to clean them off, that and/or soaking them overnight in detergent first. What are your collective opinions on that?

I was advised on another forum not to use normal soap because it leaves a residue that will lift paint.
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Post by seam-filler » Wed Jun 03, 2009 1:09 am

Normal soap's OK, but if you don't rinse it off completely, yes it can ruin paint. I use cheap dishwasher detergent - it's designed for easy rinsing.

Roughing up the surface and not using primer might work, but why? A good primer will key to the surface (as long as it's clean) and gives you a paint-ready surface. Anyway, roughing up the whole surface sounds like a lot of uneccesary work to me. There is also the danger that you may damage some detail.

On top of that, almost all resin kits have tiny pinholes in the surface. These may be impossible to see until you've primed. Better to see them in the primer than to find them in your top coat.
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Cheyenne resin

Post by wilfredo267 » Mon Oct 26, 2009 9:05 am

Hi,

i have never built a resin model befor and i decide to build a Stat Trek cheyenne class resin model. i have got to the point where i can glue the parts together but i need help with this. When i glued (super glue btw) the Naecelle to the wing(i think thats what its called) the glue didnt hold. Am i doing something wrong here?[/img]

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Post by Kylwell » Mon Oct 26, 2009 10:04 am

CA (or cyanoacrylate or Super Glue) has a huge amount of pull strength but very little shear strength. Often times with resin you'll need to pin the parts, meaning drill matching holes in both parts and add a small metal or carbon fiber (my fav) to help secure the parts. You may also want to use either a rubberized CA or an epoxy for a better/stronger joint.
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Post by starmanmm » Mon Oct 26, 2009 6:33 pm

Pinning I find is the key.

Sometime I will wrap fine wire around the pin (be it copper from left over electrical wiring, or what ever) to give it that extra gripping strength.

Remember to remove as much of the old CA as you can before you re-glue.

On a related note... I picked up at WF this year a glue called Tech-Bond. I have used it on some resin and I'll tell ya... it glued the pieces together, but good.

www.tech-bond.net

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cheyenne

Post by wilfredo267 » Tue Oct 27, 2009 3:18 pm

Thanks guys. :)

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Post by Captain Riker » Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:38 pm

OK, Is Pinning essential? I got a resin model and have been using a good CA (Good because I said so) and everything seems strong so far but there is a lot of layered parts which are also fairly small. I wasn't figuring on drilling and pinning anything so what's the deal? When should you use pins and when not?

Also, does standard gap filling putty work or do you have to use Aves? I ask again since I never used it before but I have a pack of it sitting here calling to me.

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Post by Kylwell » Mon Jul 12, 2010 11:13 pm

Anything that's load bearing should be pinned if @ all possible. It may look ok now but all it may take is a gentle bump. CA doesn't have any shear strength to speak of.

Define "standard gap filling putty". Aves is a standard gap filling putty but obviously not what you mean.
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Post by Captain Riker » Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:27 am

Sorry, I guess I mean a 'Solvent based' putty like Squadron Green or White putty that comes ready to use in a squeeze tube. Does it work the same with Resin as with Styrene?

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Post by Kylwell » Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:34 am

Because the solvent doesn't dissolve the resin to bond with it as it does styrene you'd get a tenuous bond @ best.
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Post by prisoner_1079 » Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:54 pm

So what are the options on putty to use with resin kits?

I know Aves Apoxie works, since that's what I've been using.

Auto Body Filler (Bondo) works as well?

Are there any other options as far as resin putty?

CA (superglue) glue works. I haven't tried it but I also heard packing voids/airbubbles with baking soda then applying superglue to it works really well..

Is Aves the best option?
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Post by LobsterOverlord » Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:19 pm

I have started using the new liquid Greenstuff from Games Workshop. IT's fantastic as a gap filler. I would like to know if there is the non-GW brand of this stuff, because it is fantastic, but not cheap.

John M.

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Post by Kylwell » Mon Nov 26, 2012 10:59 pm

LobsterOverlord wrote:I have started using the new liquid Greenstuff from Games Workshop. IT's fantastic as a gap filler. I would like to know if there is the non-GW brand of this stuff, because it is fantastic, but not cheap.

John M.
I thought that was just Kneadatite epoxy repackaged. http://www.polymericsystems.com/epoxies ... yellow.htm
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Post by jedge3 » Sat Apr 13, 2013 5:40 pm

The Games Workshop stuff is now a liquid gap filler that can be brushed and smoothed out with water.

On a side note has anyone used bright white tire cleaner to clean the resin? If so do you use it full strength or dilute it?

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